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Skincare myth busted

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Skincare Myths BUSTED! ☀️
Skincare Myths BUSTED! ☀️
As skincare trends grow in popularity, misinformation continues to also be spread. I can think of dozens of techniques and tips that I used to believe were true, only to learn of the probable skin damage to occur. Arguably the most important skincare myths that need to be busted revolve around sunscreen. Sunscreen protects us from harmful UV rays that cause skin damage and skin cancer! Let's see if you have heard of these as well, so we can up our skincare game and keep the skin healthy. Spf only needs to be worn on a sunny day. I think we all believed this at one point or another. Sunscreen is synonymous with a hot day on the beach, but it is important all year round. The sun's rays are prevalent in the Fall and Winter, as well as a cloudy day! Actually, 80% of the sun's rays can still penetrate through clouds (skin cancer foundation). So wear it everyday, all year round, and reapply! Chemical Sunscreens are dangerous. There are two types of sunscreens available: chemical and physical. Physical sunscreens are your more classic, white-cast prone zinc and titanium dioxide formulas. These repel UV rays and are best for sensitive skin. Chemical sunscreens use ingredients that absorb and scatter rays instead, with octinoxate, homosalate, and octocrylene for example. These typically have more transparent and desirable formulations but can be irritating to some skin types if especially sensitive. The American Academy of Dermatology has explained that articles stating the FDA investigating some chemical sunscreen ingredients is not deeming them unsafe, but instead doing further research to ensure proper usage. As always, read your skincare products ingredients and determine if they are right for you, but these ingredients are not dangerous based on any current scientific studies. Many Korean beauty products use advanced UV filters that are not yet acceptable in the US, but will protect against the sun. This is a great option for those looking for newer formulations! Krave - The Beet Shield As pictured in my cover photo, my favorite K-beauty spf! It is hydrating and transparent, leaving a glowy finish. Sunscreen is not necessary for darker skin. All skin is susceptible to sun damage and skin cancer. However, darker skin types have more natural protection against the sun than white skin does. The melanin production is increased based on geological location of ancestry. Those originally located closer to the equator naturally have darker skin to protect against UV rays. Those farthest from the equator have fair, white skin so they only need minimal exposure to the sun for Vitamin D absorption. Nowadays, we mostly get proper vitamins from our daily nutrition so this is not as necessary. -Have you heard of these myths before?
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taratheestie
The Beet Shield
Krave-The Beet Shield
MYTH BUSTED! MIX THESE INGREDIENTS OR NOT?
MYTH BUSTED! MIX THESE INGREDIENTS OR NOT?
You know what zodiac sign you’re compatible with, but do you know what skincare ingredients in your routine are compatible? Vitamin c + Niacinamide To mix or to not? Hmm YES! Layer these bad boys up in your routine. (Obviously don’t go overboard, but yes apply these both) The beloved and most sought out for serums have an iffy relationship. You can mix these ingredients together, but there is some things out there that state you shouldn’t or that you should do so in caution. Here’s why! Let’s break it down and get to the point. * Vitamin C protects the skin from free radicals and works towards brightening dark spots, scars, and the overall skin tone. This is best used in the morning to protect from free radicals as we go through our day. ALWAYS wear SPF with Vitamin C! Vitamin C will increase sun sensitivity, so please further your protection with SPF. * Niacinamide is an anti-inflammatory that brightens and promotes a more even skin tone, improves skin elasticity and texture! It’s a Holly Grail tbh. On top of all of that it’s also great to fight free radicals damage and pollution. Using Vitamin C + Niacinamide together? Niacinamide is “said” to cancel out all of the good properties of Vitamin C! BUT there are plenty of studies that show there is NO HARM in using these together. These two serums together can be a powerhouse combo We love these ingredients and need to use them in our skin care! You still can! How to use vitamin c and Niacinamide in your routine: use one ingredient in the AM and one in the PM. Try applying Vitamin C in the am (with spf!) and Niacinamide at night. This way you’ll still get both ingredient’s FULL benefits, but without irritation for reactive or sensitive skin. space them out. You need to let each serum absorb into your skin and allow some time in between applying them and they should not be layered right on top of each other. * this is only if you really feel the need to apply both of them* The results: using these can help uneven skin tone, skin elasticity, texture, and dullness of the skin. So if you plan on using these ingredients together, check out my two favorite below and featured in my photo. Fourth Ray - Raydiate Vitamin C Elixir This version of vitamin c is a mix of a serum and a face oil, so you’ll have to shake it up to mix the two together. + this is light in consistency and absorbs nicely into the skin. + not tacky or sticky. + smells great + ACTUALLY WORKS. My favorite one yet! + lasts longer than most vitamin C serums (shelf life) + $16 GOOD MOLECULES - Niacinamide Serum This GM serum is among the best and very affordable. + light weight and absorbs well into the skin + has a sticky texture, but is gone after it absorbs into the skin. + smooths our texture and brightens skin. + 10% Niacinamide + layers well with other serums and skincare. + $6
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honeybri
Niacinamide Serum
GOOD MOLECULES-Niacinamide Serum
Does silicone “suffocate” the skin? Myth busted.
Does silicone “suffocate” the skin? Myth busted.
It’s a very common misconception in the beauty world that silicones in skincare/make up “suffocate” the skin, clog the pores, and cause breakouts. Despite this myth silicone can actually benefit the skin a lot. What does Silicone do? Silicone, which is derived from silica, is a common ingredient that gives products slip, offers protection against moisture loss, and can help hide the appearance of skin texture/pores. Why doesn’t it clog the pores? To understand this you really need to understand the structure of silicone. It has a unique structure of large molecules with wide spaces in between. These large molecules are too big to “clog” the pores which is why they are used in a lot of “pore filling” primers. The silicone creates a silky texture that creates a protective barrier over the skin and in turn helps reduce the immediate appearance of pores and texture. They are unable to penetrate the pore lining where acne is formed. But don’t they suffocate the skin when used in skincare? Actually, no! Silicones in skincare can be extremely beneficial, especially to those with dry skin. Sometimes silicones can contribute to the base formula of a product. While the actives sink through the skin the silicone creates that protective layer on top. This insures the actives penetrate the skin and it prevents TEWL (Trans Epidermal Water Loss). Because the molecule is so large it sits over the pores but thanks to the wide spaces in between your skin is still “able to breathe”. One of my favorite silicone based products is the dr. brandt - Pores No More Pore Refiner Primer . This primer has a silky smooth texture that creates that “breatheable” barrier on your skin. It helps smooth over pore appearance and texture while giving the skin a matte finish (making it perfect for this with oily skin like myself). Never once has this cause me to break out and it feels very lightweight on the skin (like most silicones should). I feel like it does smooth over my pores and creates a better base for my make up to lay over top.
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Mallory
Pores No More Pore Refiner Primer
dr. brandt-Pores No More Pore Refiner Primer
Let’s Debunk Some Skincare Myths
Let’s Debunk Some Skincare Myths
To say there’s a plethora of beauty information out there would be an understatement. It can be difficult to determine what are good tips and what are myths, especially if there’s conflicting information. Let’s debunk 3 common ones that I still hear/see around the web/beauty community. If your makeup contains SPF you don’t need SPF underneath. Why is this myth incorrect? You would need to apply a lot of foundation, tinted moisturizer, or BB/CC cream to get the proper amount of SPF needed to protect your skin. For example, I have the ILIA - Super Serum Skin Tint SPF 40 with SPF 40. I only apply about the size of a dime for my whole face, and this product only provides sheer-light coverage. I would need multiple layers of this to protect my skin from UVA/UVB. You should apply SPF underneath your makeup (at least the size of a quarter!) to ensure adequate protection. I love the Supergoop! - Unseen Sunscreen Broad Spectrum SPF 40 because it’s good for all skin types, doubles as a makeup primer, reef-safe, and is cruelty-free. Face wipes clean your face as well as cleanser. Nope! Face wipes may seemingly remove all your makeup and SPF residue, but they don’t have the ability to properly cleanse your face. I don’t usually use face wipes, but I received these RAWGANIC - Pure Refreshing Facial Wipes for Christmas from a family member. I use them to remove makeup before heading to the gym or at the end of the day. If using at the end of the day, always follow up with cleanser to remove excess residue!!! Face wipes would be a good option in the AM if you have extra dry skin and want to feel clean without having to wash. Don’t mix vitamin C and niacinamide. Why is this a myth? It was believed that combining anything with vitamin C, especially niacinamide, would negate the effects of vitamin C. Vitamin C is awesome for brightening and fading dark spots, and niacinamide is great for enlarged pores, dull skin, and acne scarring. Combining these two powerhouse ingredients, such as in the GOOD MOLECULES - Niacinamide Brightening Toner , is a match made! That toner makes such a difference in my skin’s appearance (pores, dullness, scarring). Don’t want to combine but still reap the benefits? Use vitamin C in the AM (such as THE inkey LIST - Vitamin C Brightening Cream ) and niacinamide in the PM (such as PURITO - Centella Unscented Serum which contains niacinamide). You can have your cake and eat it, too! I personally will use these serums (or other ones in my collection) one right after another, but everyone’s skin is different. About me: DRYYYYYY acne-prone skin
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RebeccaSuzanne_Says
Centella Unscented Serum
PURITO-Centella Unscented Serum
Skincare Myth: Pores Open/Close
Skincare Myth: Pores Open/Close
Pores don’t open or close. They’re always “open”, to release heat via sweat and serve as hair follicles, plus contain and release sebum (oil). Sebum protects against friction and moisture loss- hence why skin produces more when you use drying products or when it senses the skin barrier is irritated. Pores can *appear* larger due to a few factors but the main two are clogged pores and collagen/elastic loss around a pore. • Clogged Pores: Sebum/Oil production is a mixture of genetics, diet, and environment. When a pore overproduces sebum or is filled with makeup residue/miscellaneous grime, it will “clog”, the malleable nature of skin allowing the pore to stretch slightly to accommodate the sebum. Boom, enlarged pores. If it progresses, the clogged pore will become a blackhead or other blemish. To prevent this, be sure to double-cleanse in the evening and if you have “oily skin”, use niacinamide. Niacinamide normalizes the pore lining, helping to control oil production and also minimize the appearance of pores. Then, exfoliation- salicylic acid is oil-soluble to breach deep into the pore. I’d limit BHA use to 2-4 days per week. • Premature Aging: Damaging elastin/collagen can cause the skin to sag and pores are not immune to this. Genetics play a role, but we’re all in luck- the largest contributor to premature aging is the sun! UV exposure is easily minimized via consistent (every day) application and reapplication (every two hours) of sunscreen. This protects your skin, from both cancer and early aging. Using antioxidants (vitamin c, vitamin e, resveratrol, niacinamide) offers protection from free radicals that would break down collagen. But if you’re already experiencing enlarged pores from premature aging, a prescription retinoid like tretinoin could help immensely by encouraging collagen synthesis and cellular turnover. Over-the-counter retinoids are a good alternative for those uninterested in prescription-strength or prescription-cost. Peptides should also be included in most anti-aging regimens and this one is no exception.
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Skinsitive
10% Niacinamide Booster
PAULA'S CHOICE-10% Niacinamide Booster
Debunking skincare myth: oils for oily skin
Debunking skincare myth: oils for oily skin
For so long, I’ve heard that if you have oily skin you must completely stay away from using oils at all times🙅🏽‍♀️ but just like we’re rediscovering that not all dietary fats are bad for us, we’re also learning that oils in skincare may actually be beneficial. It’s important to remember that our skin is meant to produce sebum to protect us from pathogens, pollution, and other environmental factors. But what happens when we’re producing more oils than we’d prefer? Possible reasons for oily skin genetic/dosha/constitution: whether you prefer to understand your body from the biomedical or traditional eastern medicine perspective, many of us carry certain predispositions to certain conditions. Ayurveda, a traditional Indian science, looks at the body in terms of balance and imbalance and when the body is in imbalance, person x may exhibit oily skin, while person y exhibits dry skin. hormonal fluctuations: puberty, stress, inflammatory diets overcleansing: using harsh cleansers (I.e. alcohol) or washing your face too often may strip necessary oils, tricking the body into thinking it needs to produce even more oil, thus overcompensating dehydration: I learned this while working in skincare. Hydration is key in structural support of the skin, like collagen. When our skin is lacking hydration, our skin produces more oils as a protective mechanism from the environment (pollution, pathogens.) Over the last few years, as I’ve come out of my oily, acne-prone pubescent skin, I’ve allowed myself the chance to discover the benefits of face oils. Many of them serve the purpose of nourishing and protecting the skin. How to use face oils 1. Dampen the skin with a hydrating toner or water mist for better absorption of the oil 2. If you’re just introducing face oils, start of with light-medium oils that regulate sebum production, such as now - Solutions, Certified Organic, Jojoba Oil 3. BEWARE!! Coconut oil is comedogenic (pore-clogging) for most... Although, some people, specifically of African/Caribbean/Indian descent, have been able to use it just fine. 4. And yes oil cleansing should be fine for oily skin too, as oil draws out oil plugs. Just make sure to use one that emulsifies, like the Corpa Flora - Beauté Divine Sensitive Skin Cleansing Oil which doesn’t even require double cleansing, but it’s completely up to you 🤗
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valchemic
 Solutions, Certified Organic, Jojoba Oil
now- Solutions, Certified Organic, Jojoba Oil
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